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Passionflower for Dogs as a Natural and Safe Calming Aid

Passion flower for dogs natural safe calming organic

Passionflower for Dogs as a Natural and Safe Calming Aid

Passion flower is a perennial climbing vine with herbaceous shoots and a strong wood stem that can grow up to 30 feet, and is known for its fragrance and vibrant flowers. The ancient Aztecs reportedly used passion flower as a calming sedative and pain reliever. It is used today as a natural calming agent and sleep aid, as it helps to relax the body, mind and tummy.

The same qualities that calm, relax, and help induce sleep in humans have been shown effective in dogs – helping passion flower become one of the most widely used ingredients in dog remedies available today.

Promote good health with reduced stress

We all know that stress can lead to health issues, either directly or indirectly – through lack of sleep, reduced digestion effectiveness, irritability, rushed and impulsive actions.

By reducing your dog’s day-to-day stress, you can give them a better quality of life with improved diet, sleeping patterns and overall mood – allowing them to shift their focus on positive interactions with their family and doggy friends.

The Science: Passion Flower, Passiflora incarnata L., occasionally P. lutea L. Family: Passifloraceae

Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, as it reduces the amount of nerve cell activity – which has a calming and relaxing effect.

Passion Flower also contains harmala alkaloid, which acts as a monoamine oxidase inhibitor to stop the breakdown of monoamine neurotransmitters.

Essentially, Passion Flower has properties that prevent vital neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin) from breaking down, which increases their levels in the body and results in improved mood and temperament.

Perfect for calming separation anxiety

Dogs are very susceptible to separation anxiety (especially puppies!), and it can feel like a lifetime when their owner is away for any period of time.

Too often, this anxiety escalates and results in destructive behavior and bad habits – which can lead to a negative cascade of events where the owner scolds the puppy for this behavior and isolates them further, creating more separation anxiety.

Help your dog avoid stress and anxiety by safely administering Passion Flower (a natural calming agent) with organic Passion Flower tea – brewed normally and diluted in cold water.  This is the least jarring method to deliver calming passion flower to your dog’s tummy, where most other methods can induce stress in the activity of delivery itself.  (Think about the last time you gave your dog a pill!)  In contrast, placing a cool bowl of diluted Passion Flower tea down in front of your dog to drink is about as natural and non-invasive as it can get.

Passion flower for dogs natural safe calming organic

Passion Flower in place of Valerian Root

While Valerian Root is widely accepted as a useful herb for promoting sleep, treating aggression and reducing anxiety – Valerian Root can actually create the reverse of the desired effects.  As a depressant, Valerian Root can have a slowing effect that can leave your dog irritable, groggy, and even aggressive.

In contrast, Passion Flower is more of a mood elevator that calms the mind, body and tummy – not a depressant like Valerian Root.

Bond with your dog

Passion flower is safe for both humans and dogs – a great way to bond with your pet is to share your tea.

Brew some passion flower tea, pour a hot mug for yourself and pour some into your dog’s cold water bowl to dilute and cool it.

Cautions:
While the medicinal benefits of Passion Flower may help your dog, those same benefits may also mask underlying problems that should not be ignored.  If you have concern that your dog has health issues, consult a veterinary physician.

Do not administer to pregnant or lactating dogs, as Passion Flower is a uterine stimulant and may cause constrictions.

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